Subscribe!

 Full Posts

Bloglines Subscribe in Bloglines
Newsgator Subscribe in NewsGator Online
MyYahoo
Google Add to Google
netvibes Add to Netvibes

Copyleft

ESAblawg is an educational effort by Keith W. Rizzardi. Correspondence with this site does not create a lawyer-client relationship. Photos or links may be copyrighted (but used with permission, or as fair use). ESA blawg is published with a Creative Commons License.

Creative Commons License

florida gators... never threatened!

If you ain't a Gator, you should be! Alligators (and endangered crocs) are important indicator species atop their food chains, with sensitivity to pollution and pesticides akin to humans. See ESA blawg. Gator blood could be our pharmaceutical future, too. See ESA musing.

gatorlogo2.gif

Follow the truth.

"This institution will be based on the illimitable freedom of the human mind. For here we are not afraid to follow truth wherever it may lead, nor to tolerate any error so long as reason is left free to combat it." -- Thomas Jefferson to William Roscoe, December 27, 1820.

uvaswords.jpg

Thanks, Kevin.

KEVIN S. PETTITT helped found this blawg. A D.C.-based IT consultant specializing in Lotus Notes & Domino, he also maintains Lotus Guru blog.

« FWS reduces critical habitat for Bay checkerspot butterfly, designates critical habitat for San Diego thornmint | Main| Endangered species at the polls: the candidates views »

Emergency permit allows take of infected Alaskan bison

Category
Bookmark : del.icio.us  Technorati  Digg This  Add To Furl  Add To YahooMyWeb  Add To Reddit  Add To NewsVine 


73 FR 50834 / 73 Fed. Reg. 50384 (August 28, 2008)(DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR; Fish and Wildlife Service; WS-R9-IA-2008-N0228; 96300-1671-0000-P5 Emergency Exemption: Issuance of Permit for Endangered Species; Notice of emergency issuance of permit for endangered species).

AlaskaDFGwoodbison.jpg
Wood bison are 10 to 15% heavier than plains bison, making them the largest native land mammal in North America. They are well adapted to northern habitats, having lived in northern meadows and forests for thousands of years.  Photo and caption information from Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On August 15, 2008, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) issued a permit (PRT-192748) to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fairbanks, AK, to take one captive held male wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) for the purpose of scientific research into animal and human health. This action was authorized under Section 10(c) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). The Service determined that an emergency affecting the health and life of the Alaska captive held population existed, and that no reasonable alternative was available to the applicant for the following reasons: One seven year old adult male wood bison owned by the State of Alaska and held at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center, Girdwood, Alaska, became weak and emaciated, and tested positive for Cryptosporidium, threatening the health of other wood bison in the captive herd and presenting a risk to human health.

KEITHINKING: The environmentally adaptable cryptosporidium parasite triggers severe diarrhea in humans, and if runoff from animal feces reaches a nearby watershed, the parasite can quickly contaminate a public water supply and it will survive the chlorination process.  A press release with additional explanation from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game is available online.