Subscribe!

 Full Posts

Bloglines Subscribe in Bloglines
Newsgator Subscribe in NewsGator Online
MyYahoo
Google Add to Google
netvibes Add to Netvibes

Copyleft

ESAblawg is an educational effort by Keith W. Rizzardi. Correspondence with this site does not create a lawyer-client relationship. Photos or links may be copyrighted (but used with permission, or as fair use). ESA blawg is published with a Creative Commons License.

Creative Commons License

florida gators... never threatened!

If you ain't a Gator, you should be! Alligators (and endangered crocs) are important indicator species atop their food chains, with sensitivity to pollution and pesticides akin to humans. See ESA blawg. Gator blood could be our pharmaceutical future, too. See ESA musing.

gatorlogo2.gif

Follow the truth.

"This institution will be based on the illimitable freedom of the human mind. For here we are not afraid to follow truth wherever it may lead, nor to tolerate any error so long as reason is left free to combat it." -- Thomas Jefferson to William Roscoe, December 27, 1820.

uvaswords.jpg

Thanks, Kevin.

KEVIN S. PETTITT helped found this blawg. A D.C.-based IT consultant specializing in Lotus Notes & Domino, he also maintains Lotus Guru blog.

« ESA update: News, Musings, Federal Register announcements and other holiday happenings | Main| NOAA proposes revised critical habitat for leatherback sea turtle and may list false killer whales »

FWS begins 2010 with ESA bang: listing Galapagos Petrel, Heinroth’s Shearwater, proposed listing of twelve foreign birds (but withdrawal of Cook's petrel listing)

Category
Bookmark : del.icio.us  Technorati  Digg This  Add To Furl  Add To YahooMyWeb  Add To Reddit  Add To NewsVine 

KEITHINKING: Fourteen listing notices by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the first week of the new year?  The Obama Administration certainly started 2010 with a strong statement in response to the criticism by environmentalists that it has failed to act aggressively to list species for protection under the ESA.  See prior ESA blawg.  Is it a coincidence?  Were the notices already in the works?  Or did the environmentalists media campaign have its intended effects?  Whatever the answer, it doesn't matter for the Cook's petrel, a New Zealand bird that was originally thought to  need ESA protection, but for which population estimates were wildly off.  After further review, the previous proposed listing is now proposed for withdrawal.

75 Fed. Reg. 310 (Tuesday, January 5, 2010) / Proposed Rule
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR / Fish and Wildlife Service / 50 CFR Part 17
Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Withdrawal of Proposed Rule to List Cook’s Petrel
AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.
ACTION: Proposed rule; withdrawal.
SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, withdraw our December 17, 2007, proposal (72 FR 71298) to list the Cook’s petrel (Pterodroma cookii) as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended. Based on a thorough review of the best available scientific data, we do not believe this species is likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.

Cookspetrel1.jpg
The Cook’s petrel (Pterodroma cookii) is a small, grey and white gadfly petrel that is endemic to the New Zealand archipelago.  The population of the Cook’s petrel on Little Barrier Island was thought to be about 50,000 pairs. Using GIS (Geographic Information System) technology, scientisits determined that the population is approximately 286,000 pairs.  In addition, the populations on Little Barrier and Codfish islands are increasing following predator eradications. The minimum world population for Cook’s petrel is estimated to be approximately 1,300,000 individuals, with an increasing population trend.  Image from Wikipedia.

FOR THE LISTING DECISIONS, including the Galapagos Petrel, Heinroth’s Shearwater, and twelve foreign birds...  
75 Fed. Reg. 235 (Tuesday, January 5, 2010) / Rules and Regulations
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR / Fish and Wildlife Service / 50 CFR Part 17
Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Rule To List the Galapagos Petrel and Heinroth’s Shearwater as Threatened Throughout Their Ranges
AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.
ACTION: Final rule.
SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), determine threatened status for the Galapagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia) previously referred to as (Pterodroma phaeopygia phaeopygia); and the Heinroth’s shearwater (Puffinus heinrothi) under the EndangeredSpecies Act of 1973, as amended (Act). This rule implements the Federal protections provided by the Act for these two foreign seabird species.

75 Fed. Reg. 606 (Tuesday, January 5, 2010) / Proposed Rules
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR / Fish and Wildlife Service / 50 CFR Part 17
Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Foreign Bird Species in Peru and Bolivia as Endangered Throughout Their Range
AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.
ACTION: Proposed rule.
SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), propose to list the following six South American bird species (collectively referred to as ‘‘species’’ for purposes of this proposed rule) as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act) (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.): ash-breasted tit-tyrant (Anairetes alpinus), Junı´n grebe (Podiceps taczanowskii), Junı´n rail (Laterallus tuerosi), Peruvian plantcutter (Phytotoma raimondii), royal cinclodes (Cinclodes aricomae), and white-browed tit-spinetail (Leptasthenura xenothorax)—all native to Peru. The ash-breasted tit-tyrant and royal cinclodes are also native to Bolivia. This proposal, if made final, would extend the Act’s protection to these species. The Service seeks data and comments from the public on this proposed rule.

75 Fed. Reg. 286 (Tuesday, January 5, 2010) /
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR / Fish and Wildlife Service / 50 CFR Part 17
Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Six Foreign Birds as Endangered Throughout Their Range
AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.
ACTION: Proposed rule.
SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, propose to list the following six foreign species found on islands in French Polynesia and in Europe, Southeast Asia, and Africa: Cantabrian capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus cantabricus); Marquesan Imperial Pigeon (Ducula galeata); the Eiao Polynesian warbler (Acrocephalus percernis aquilonis), previously referred to as (Acrocephalus mendanae aquilonis); greater adjutant (Leptoptilos dubius); Jerdon’s courser (Rhinoptilus bitorquatus); and slender-billed curlew (Numenius tenuirostris) as endangered, pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended. This proposal, if made final, would extend the Act’s protection to these species. We seek data and comments from the public on this proposed rule.