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ESAblawg is an educational effort by Keith W. Rizzardi. Correspondence with this site does not create a lawyer-client relationship. Photos or links may be copyrighted (but used with permission, or as fair use). ESA blawg is published with a Creative Commons License.

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florida gators... never threatened!

If you ain't a Gator, you should be! Alligators (and endangered crocs) are important indicator species atop their food chains, with sensitivity to pollution and pesticides akin to humans. See ESA blawg. Gator blood could be our pharmaceutical future, too. See ESA musing.

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Follow the truth.

"This institution will be based on the illimitable freedom of the human mind. For here we are not afraid to follow truth wherever it may lead, nor to tolerate any error so long as reason is left free to combat it." -- Thomas Jefferson to William Roscoe, December 27, 1820.

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Thanks, Kevin.

KEVIN S. PETTITT helped found this blawg. A D.C.-based IT consultant specializing in Lotus Notes & Domino, he also maintains Lotus Guru blog.

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FWS reopens public comment on draft northern spotted owl recovery plan, and announces final rule revising critical habitat for San Diego ambrosia

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75 Fed. Reg. 74073 (Tuesday, November 30, 2010) / Notices
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service
FWS–R1–ES–2010–N250; 10120–1113–0000–C2
Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Recovery Plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina); Reopening of Public Comment Period
AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.
ACTION: Notice of document availability; reopening of comment period.
SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, recently announced the availability of the Draft Revised Recovery Plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) for public review and comment... We now reopen the comment period. Electronic copies of the draft revised recovery plan are available online at: http://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/100915.pdfhttp://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/100915.pdf and http://www.fws.gov/oregonfwo/Species/Data/NorthernSpottedOwl/Recovery/

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75 Fed. Reg. 74546 (Tuesday, November 30, 2010) / Rules and Regulations
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR / Fish and Wildlife Service
50 CFR Part 17 / Docket No. FWS–R8–ES–2009–0054; MO 92210–0–0009–B4 / RIN 1018–AW20
Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Rule Designating Critical Habitat for Ambrosia pumila (San Diego ambrosia)
AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.
ACTION: Final rule.http://www.fws.gov/oregonfwo/Species/Data/NorthernSpottedOwl/Recovery/. Printed copies of the draft revised recovery plan are available by request from the Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Oregon Fish and Wildlife Office, 2600 SE. 98th Avenue, Ste. 100, Portland, OR 97266 (phone: 503/231–6179). Written comments regarding this recovery plan, or requests for copies of the plan, should be addressed to the above Portland address or sent by e-mail to: NSORPComments@fws.gov
SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), are designating critical habitat for Ambrosia pumila (San Diego ambrosia) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended. Approximately 783 acres (317 hectares) are being designated as critical habitat for A. pumila in Riverside and San Diego counties, California. DATES: This rule becomes effective on December 30, 2010.

EXCERPT: Records indicate that Ambrosia pumila historically was known from over 50 locations in San Diego and Riverside counties, but the number of extant occurrences has been dramatically reduced because much of the species’ habitat has been impacted
by human activities ... In our 2009 proposed rule (74 FR 44247, August 27, 2009), we proposed approximately 802 acres (ac) (324 hectares (ha)) as critical habitat in 7 units with 8 subunits in Riverside and San Diego Counties, California. We reevaluated our data in conjunction with information received during the comment period and information obtained after the publication of the 2009 proposed rule. Based on this reevaluation, we changed our proposal to approximately 1,140 ac (461 ha) in 7 units, which collectively consist of 13 subunits (75 FR 27690, May 18, 2010).In this final critical habitat rule, we are designating approximately 783 ac (317 ha) as critical habitat in 6 units with 13 subunits, reflecting the exclusion of approximately 329 ac (133 ha) based on consideration of relevant impacts under section 4(b)(2) of the Act.